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LightAndTimeArt

Vintage Camera Picture Frame, Spartus Full-Vue Camera, 5x7 Picture Frame

Regular price $103.00 CAD
Regular price Sale price $103.00 CAD
Sale Sold out
Shipping calculated at checkout.

Showcase your favorite 5x7 photo in style with a vintage camera picture frame.
Vintage Spartus Full-Vue Camera converted into a stylish and great looking picture frame.
The crystal-clear, acrylic 5x7 frame elegantly displays your picture on a black wood base and allows easy photo load and change
The picture frame stands vertically with a slanted back to display your favorite moments and memories at home or in the office
This beautiful picture frame makes a unique, eco-friendly gift for grandparents, photographer and vintage lover.
Handmade in the USA by small business.
(c) 2021 LightAndTimeArt
Measures 10" (width) x 5.5" (deep) x 8" (height) 

DISCLAIMER: " The logos and trademarks on the upcycled, individual items are those of their respective brand name owners, none of which are associated with this product. "

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Dimensions

Height: inches
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Length: inches

History

The simple Spartus Full-Vue plastic pseudo TLR was made from 1948 to 1960 by American manufacturer Spartus, later Herold Products. This model exposes 2¼" square images on 120 film. The lens of its viewfinder is larger in diameter than its taking lens, giving a bright finder image on the hooded matte screen. The name "Full-Vue" resembles another box camera with big reflecting finder, the British Ful-Vue. In fact, the more direct connection is to the Falcon Magni-View from Utility Mfg. Co. of New York, several of whose models were reissued by Spartus Spartus used various metal face-plate designs and plastic moldings over the production period. Early examples were made of Bakelite, although later models may have been other plastics. The Full-Vue is also seen labeled with "The Spencer Co." or "Galter Products Co." as the manufacturer's name—a nebulous distinction, as all these entities shared the same address on West Lake St. in Chicago