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PYREX C17 Clear Vintage Glass Insulator

PYREX C17 Clear Vintage Glass Insulator

Regular price $7.00 CAD
Regular price $11.00 CAD Sale price $7.00 CAD
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Clear PYREX C17 glass insulator

This style was developed for telephone carrier circuits using small steel pins. Initially Corning Pyrex glass was used and later many companies produced this style.

Note: The insulators a free of any major cracks but might have some minor nicks/chips.

Use this insulator with my indoor lamp base.

We also have gift certificates available for your friends.

Dimensions

Insulator diameter: 2.5 inches

Height:4.0 inches

CD Number

CD 128

History

Corning-Pyrex insulators were manufactured by the Corning Glass Works in Corning, New York, from 1924 through 1951.
Initial consideration to use glass as an insulator material by Corning is dated as far back as 1913 according to existing records. Pyrex glass was developed in 1915 by Corning and was used for cookware, bakeware, and laboratory glass products. Pyrex is a heat-shock resistant borosilicate glass of 80% silica, 4% alkali, 2% alumina, and 13% boric acid. Trademark Pyrex was registered July 10, 1915, issued July 13, 1917, and patented May 27, 1919, #1,304,623. Corning used Pyrex glass for all of their production of communication, power, and radio insulators.
The permanent characteristics of the glass sold under the Pyrex trademark met the insulation requirements for high voltage transmission.

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  • Glass Insulators

    Glass insulators were first produced in the 1850's for use with telegraph lines. As technology developed insulators were needed for telephone lines, electric power lines, and other applications. In the mid 1960's a few people began collecting these antique glass insulators. Today there are over 3,000 insulator collectors.

  • “CD” NUMBERS

    All glass pintype insulators are classified in what is called the “CD Numbering” system of identification. This system was created and used by N.R. “Woody” Woodward, an early pioneer, researcher and author in the field of collecting glass insulators. The CD (Consolidated Design) numbers basically identify insulators by their shape and profile, regardless of exact embossed markings, glass color, or base type.